THE WORKING THEORY 
Working with Clay should be fun, a bit of a mess, and aim toward objects that are enduring, graceful and unique.

THE INESCAPABLE TRUTH

One handmade ceramic is better than one thousand throwaway plastics.

CS_web_tools-0_2.jpg

To see all pottery available for sale, please visit the portfolios tab: 
Vases and other Vessels
Coffee and Tea
Bowls
Jars and Canisters
Little Guys 

CS_web_tools-0_1.jpg  CS_web_tools-0_3.jpg

All stoneware and porcelain pieces begin on the wheel, are dried leather hard, then trimmed and finished by hand off the wheel. The second part of the process can take anywhere from an hour to several days, depending on the complexity of the form. Dry work is then hardened off in a bisque firing. Porous and brittle at that stage, it is then glazed, and fired to roughly 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature (cone 10 in potters' lingo) that transforms the glaze to glass and hardens each pottery piece to the hardness of stone. Mixed media works are then completed with the incorporation of stone, leather, copper or other media, depending on the form.

Feet are stone burnished on the wheel during trimming to compress the clay and minimize abrasive properties. Some pieces are then sanded or placed on a diamond wheel after the final firing -- ground smooth to prevent scratching. Please note that stoneware clays are inherently rougher than porcelain, so while every effort is made to smooth the piece, some care is advised using stoneware on fine wood surfaces.
All pottery is made by hand in Vermont by CS Manegold.

Functional ware is microwave and dishwasher safe, and finished with non-toxic glazes. Some decorative and mixed media work incorporates glazes that are not food safe, but these glazes are generally reserved for the exterior of the pots. Please see individual listings for those details or reach out if you have questions. And watch for new work which will be uploaded to this site as time and new firings allow...

woodcock_with_pots-0_3.jpg
Stay in touch!          
Contact Bridport Hill through the Guest Book. 
Check in on Facebook and Instagram.
Peruse Portfolios for little guys, bowls, vases and vessels and more.
and come back here to see new works, specials and upcoming events.

                                                      
   logo.right.jpg       
Yep... Bridport, Vermont has no "g" and no companion town in the U.S. though there is a Bridport, England. And for those of us with dyslexia, sometimes I write Bird.port (which I rather like!). There you have it:  B.R.I.D.P.O.R.T.  






 
     






BLOG SECTIONS

Method

https://vimeo.com/355141641

THE WORKING THEORY 
Working with Clay should be fun, a bit of a mess, and aim toward objects that are enduring, graceful and unique.

THE INESCAPABLE TRUTH

One handmade ceramic is better than one thousand throwaway plastics.

CS_web_tools-0_2.jpg

To see all pottery available for sale, please visit the portfolios tab: 
Vases and other Vessels
Coffee and Tea
Bowls
Jars and Canisters
Little Guys 

CS_web_tools-0_1.jpg  CS_web_tools-0_3.jpg

All stoneware and porcelain pieces begin on the wheel, are dried leather hard, then trimmed and finished by hand off the wheel. The second part of the process can take anywhere from an hour to several days, depending on the complexity of the form. Dry work is then hardened off in a bisque firing. Porous and brittle at that stage, it is then glazed, and fired to roughly 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature (cone 10 in potters' lingo) that transforms the glaze to glass and hardens each pottery piece to the hardness of stone. Mixed media works are then completed with the incorporation of stone, leather, copper or other media, depending on the form.

Feet are stone burnished on the wheel during trimming to compress the clay and minimize abrasive properties. Some pieces are then sanded or placed on a diamond wheel after the final firing -- ground smooth to prevent scratching. Please note that stoneware clays are inherently rougher than porcelain, so while every effort is made to smooth the piece, some care is advised using stoneware on fine wood surfaces.
All pottery is made by hand in Vermont by CS Manegold.

Functional ware is microwave and dishwasher safe, and finished with non-toxic glazes. Some decorative and mixed media work incorporates glazes that are not food safe, but these glazes are generally reserved for the exterior of the pots. Please see individual listings for those details or reach out if you have questions. And watch for new work which will be uploaded to this site as time and new firings allow...

woodcock_with_pots-0_3.jpg
Stay in touch!          
Contact Bridport Hill through the Guest Book. 
Check in on Facebook and Instagram.
Peruse Portfolios for little guys, bowls, vases and vessels and more.
and come back here to see new works, specials and upcoming events.

                                                      
   logo.right.jpg       
Yep... Bridport, Vermont has no "g" and no companion town in the U.S. though there is a Bridport, England. And for those of us with dyslexia, sometimes I write Bird.port (which I rather like!). There you have it:  B.R.I.D.P.O.R.T.  






 
     






BLOG SECTIONS